FROM NORTHERN NEVADA

MUM’S THE WORD IN THE DESERT

There is a festival out in the Black Rock Desert (200 miles north/northeast of Reno) held every year at this time where freedom of expression rules. Interestingly enough we have been banned from using the festival’s name. So much for true freedom of expression.

Pictured above is Devine making a delivery to a location we call Urning-bay An-may (pig latin for the actual name).

FROM THE DRIVER’S SEAT

TEXTALYZER

Just like a breathalyzer tests a driver’s breath to gauge the level of alcohol in his system, a textalyzer will gauge whether or not a driver has been tapping or swiping their phone.

After an accident, law enforcement can plug the driver’s phone into the device to check if was being used prior to the accident. Many legal experts believe a textalyzer is an invasion of privacy as well as an imperfect solution in determining who was actually doing the texting or if speech-to-text was enabled.

While the textalyzer will likely end up in the Supreme Court for individual drivers, truck drivers are held to a higher standard and such a device may very well become part of the accident review process in incidents involving commercial truck drivers.

It is still under review, and we will keep you posted.

TRIVIA

Question:  What is the Latin word for “elsewhere?”

Hint:  This word is often used when a person under suspicion of a crime was somewhere else when the crime was committed.

Answer:  Alibi

CAAP 3.0

Ten years ago, the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach announced their joint Clean Air Action Plan (CAAP), which called for an aggressive retirement schedule for older trucks, and, in the case of the Port of Los Angeles, a requirement that all truck drivers serving their port be employees rather than have the option of being independent business owners.

The employee-mandate was struck down by the US Supreme Court, and the undisputed and necessary truck retirement schedule forged ahead. Since the CAAP was enforced, the LA/Long Beach port complex has seen an 87% reduction in diesel particulate matter (DPM), 98% reduction in sulfur oxides (SOx), and 57% reduction in nitrogen oxide (NOx). Between 2015 and 2016, the emission levels fell 13%, 14%, 10% respectively.

Now, we have CAAP 3.0, which pushes for zero emission equipment. The plan bets on future reductions by using equipment which is not yet available. It vastly underestimates the costs involved for everyone in the supply chain to comply, and it does not consider the realities of the competitive forces drawing cargo to US east and gulf coast ports.

In fact, a study commissioned by the Pacific Merchant Shipping Association (PMSA) found CAAP 3.0 could actually increase greenhouse gas emissions by 22% as cargo owners choose more economical gateways on the east coast or gulf coast. These ports are further from Asia and will require more fuel and longer voyages.

As an industry, we need to be good shepherds of our environment, and we need to be focused on economic growth. The ports’ plan does nothing to balance these two important goals.

We can do better.

NAME THAT PART

 

Do you know what this part is? It is something used in truck or container transportation.

Play “Name That Part” by liking us on Facebook. Click here to be directed to our Facebook page and place your guess.

Good luck!

GROWN UP IN OAKLAND

We have mentioned in past newsletters that SSA’s terminal in Oakland is raising four cranes by 27′ to accommodate the new, larger mega ships, but seeing it first hand was really impressive.

Pictured in the foreground is the newly raised crane. Pictured to the right in yellow is the jack used to hold and raise it. Pictured in the background is a pre-raised crane. Trust us, it is not the distance making it look stubby. It is diminutive in comparison.

Thanks for the tour SSA!

AYE AYE MATEY

Quadriga is building the largest cargo sailing ship. The vessel will be 558′ long, will carry up to 2,000 cars and will travel at 10-12 knots. Cool, right!?!