ELDs AND THE WAITING GAME

It has been nearly three months since Electronic Logging Devices (ELDs) became mandatory for commercial trucks.  The result has been decreased capacity and increased pricing in ALL trucking sectors.

“Just ask the driver to wait” needs to be removed from our vernacular.  Drivers no longer have any wiggle room and do not have the time to wait at the guard shack…to wait for a chassis to be unstacked…to wait for a problem to be resolved…to wait for a quality container to be found…to wait for service in the shipping/ receiving office…to wait in queues…to wait to be loaded/unloaded…to wait in traffic…to wait period.

These inefficiencies have been shouldered by the driver, but no more.  There is a cost to these inefficiencies, and those costs are now being transferred to the cargo owner.  To limit your exposure, take the waits out of the equation and get the trucks on the road.

THE HEART OF TRUCKING

Through their regional units and activities, members of the California Trucking Association (CTA) donated more than $300,000 to charities throughout the state.  The slogan “Trucks Bring It” not only means cargo but goodwill as well.

THE DEFINITION OF HUBRIS

Hubris [hyoo-bris], noun, excessive pride or self-confidence, arrogance, see southern California ports.  (Okay, we added that last part.)

Last month, we highlighted the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach Clean Air Action Plan (CAAP) requiring zero-emission trucks and terminal equipment, but it warrants further discussion.

The cost of this program is wildly underestimated by the ports.  They are betting on equipment that is yet to be tested and viable.  They are also betting the cargo owners so love a Southern California Gateway they are willing to absorb the lion’s share of the burden.

Weigh that thinking with the fact that just last week, the Panama Canal celebrated its 2,000th neopanamax crossing since the opening of the new, larger locks just 15 months ago.

Wake up California!  Cargo, like water, will find the course of least resistance.

AYE AYE MATEY

Quadriga is building the largest cargo sailing ship. The vessel will be 558′ long, will carry up to 2,000 cars and will travel at 10-12 knots. Cool, right!?!