A FUTURE IN TRUCKING

There is a campaign to lower the age in which a person can obtain a commercial driver’s license (CDL) from 21 to 18.  With the nationwide driver shortage continuing to mount, getting recent high school graduates into the trucking trade before they are lost to other industries is a good thing.  

 

In Northern California, Patterson High School recognizes the value of logistics. They not only have a logistics program at the school they are also offering a truck driving course.  

IS IT GROUNDHOG DAY?

The cities and ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach are at it again.  They are trying to force every driver and every trucking company into the same mold by dictating drivers be employees rather than have the choice to be an independent entrepreneur.

There is enough room in this industry to accommodate both options, and it should be left up to the driver to determine what is best for his or her lifestyle.

UNCOMMONLY COMMON

Click on the video link above to see how the most common job by state has changed over the last forty years.

Trucking has not been affected by globalization and automation, two factors which have had a negative impact on US jobs.  After all, a worker overseas cannot drive a truck in Texas, and despite technology, we still need a driver behind the wheel.

MAKING THE NEWS

Last month, we featured Robert St. John, Devine Driver Trainer, being interviewed by the local news.  ABC’s Sacramento affiliate was doing a story on jobs in Sacramento that pay more than their Bay Area counterparts.  Trucking was one of those jobs, and Robert is a great spokesperson for the industry.  Click the photo above for the link to the news clip.Robert ABC 10 Interview Oct 30 2015 013

CALIFORNIA’S DROUGHT CONTINUES

Where Does Your Food Come FromDespite recent “spring showers,” California is in a desperate drought. There are many rivers without adequate flow for young salmon to make their way to the ocean. The state is actually trucking these fish from their birthplaces up river to the delta so they can safely migrate out to sea. It is so despairing, farmers are pulling out trees because there is not enough water to support them…trees that take $1,000’s and $1,000’s to plant and years to grow. When rain does finally return to the state, it will be a long recovery for the entire nation. The attached graphic depicts the dependence on California grown nuts, fruits and vegetables.